TORC

Change Management

Quick look

Our change management practice is about making change easier. Practical in our approach, we address the subject in accessible terms, providing clients with a structured array of business process, project management and communication tools to deal with the many challenges involved. Central to our whole philosophy is how to integrate the human element effectively – examining the behaviour patterns of individuals & managing the varied manifestations that can arise.

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Leaders

Change-Project Managers

Line Managers

General Staff

Biology teaches that an organism tends towards atrophy & extinction, unless peppered with change & renewal. History makes the same point with regard to the fall of empires.

These lessons are not lost on modern business, daily buffeted by economic & technological swings. But the paradox for an organisation is how to structure itself so it can bend with these winds rather than risk breaking by trying to hold firm.

Torc Consulting Group takes a strategic & systemic approach to organisational change. We first work with the relevant stakeholders to define the strategic intent of the organisation & map the required workflows to turn that intent into reality. Only then do we engage in developing the appropriate size & structure for the organisation & in managing the impacts on the present organisation.

The ultimate challenge is to embed in the changed organisation the capacity to continue to propagate change on demand. This requires establishing an ongoing process for begetting & controlling change – and, most importantly, structuring support mechanisms to counter the inevitable relapse.

We are especially attuned to the human and emotional landscape obtaining and bring a rich mixture of experience, conceptual frameworks and process management tools to bear on the wide range of challenges arising.

We operate from a core philosophy that for large-scale change to succeed, it must not only spread out, down and across organizational boundaries, but also be internalized into the fundamental attitudes, psychological motivations and cultural values of the employees.

Accordingly, we support Senior Managers, Change-Project Managers, Line Managers and General Staff in enabling and inculcating the needed levels of communication, participation and engagement. We work collaboratively with each group to assess their place in the change management process, clarifying their concerns, leveraging their strengths & empowering their actions.

Leaders

  • Stress the Human Dimension. Balance the economic/ technical aspects of change with an equal focus on the human imperative.
  • Set the Direction. Be clear on the reasons for change & frank with regard to the gain & pain accruing in its implementation.
  • Share the Burden. Build followership amid line managers & front-line staff – as change isn’t installed until internalised.
  • Ensure Executive Support. Lead from a different place – sharpening the urgency on line managers to make things happen.
  • Model the way to Communicate. Meet with all levels to share the reasons & plans – & the questions not yet fully worked out.
  • Don’t have all the Answers. Engage with employees as meaningful contributors (not just doers) – leaving openings for them to color in the detail of the changes.
  • Cultivate one’s Charismatic Side. Reach out through the organisational layers to make connections at an individual level – be visible & empathetic.
  • Go the Extra Mile. Challenge the organisation to improve on the initial change plan – without departing from its broad thrust.
  • Remain Actively Engaged. Provide support & visibility to the change team. Celebrate early-wins & recognise early-adopters.
  • Compromise, if Warranted. Be tolerant of setbacks & open to bottom-up improvements on the change plan.

Change-Project Managers

  • Build Project Management System. Charter, resources, roles, processes, decision-making, feedback, conflict resolution, etc.
  • Take time to Mobilise. Develop ways of working – forming, storming, norming & performing phases.
  • Brush up on Competencies. Planning, project managing, coalition building, decision-making, active listening, etc.
  • Sharpen one’s Tool-kit. Process maps, learning maps, stakeholder maps, balanced scorecard, future search, risk mgmt.
  • Internalise the Role. Be comfortable being planner, controller, manager – but also evangelist, intrapreneur & coach.
  • Build coalition with Line Managers. Involve line managers in front-line communications – as trust diminishes with hierarchy.
  • Communicate Face-Face. Utilise Socratic questionning to evoke self-discovery in others, making it safe to learn & engage.
  • Leave space for Detail. Urge line managers & staff to accept initial ambiguity as an invitation to inquire, engage & take action.
  • Stay on top of Proceedings. Collect, integrate & report results from initial change steps, letting the data speak for itself.
  • Focus on Opportunities. Harness setbacks positively, challenging others to find creative solutions.

Line Managers

  • Link to Context. Establish line of sight between changes required at individual dept. level and overall change strategy..
  • Reframe to the Future. Communicate, as if change has been already achieved – & create relentless discomfort with status quo.
  • Salute Early-Adopters. Provide support & encouragement to staff showing early engagement & commitment.
  • Engage in 2-way Conversations. Probe for issues/obstacles, leave room for improvisation & propose/invite solutionsso staff can become partners in implementing the change.
  • Confront Resistors. Deal early with conflict, assist others grow by creating constructive stress to raise issues & generate urgency.
  • Revitalise Teamwork. Preempt any threat to teamwork anxieties, ensuring everyone stays strongly customer-focused throughout..
  • Ask for Support. Help people through the neutral zone with 2-way communication that emphasises connection with and concern for individual staff.
  • Reiterate the 4-P’s. Purpose (Why?), Picture (What?), Plan (How?) & Part (Who?).
  • Make Progress Visible. Celebrate the early wins & highlight how revisions proposed by team are being incorporated.
  • Look out for No. 1. Evaluate how changes envisaged will impact your career & avail of all supports to best capitalise.

General Staff

  • Know what you want. Inquire, explore & understand how changes will impact your position/career – & fit with your future.
  • Discuss with Line Manager. Discuss impacts, ask questions, talk to peers, integrate & understand what the change may entail.
  • Ask for Support. Seek out a trusted mentor/coach/counsellor, that is open to discuss & assist with personal concerns.
  • Involve Partner/Family. Bring your partner/family into your confidence & keep them informed as matters unfold.
  • Read up on Psychology. Understand the psychology of transitionthe importance of the neutral zone, of letting go & moving on.
  • Control one’s Emotions. Avoid self-sabotaging activities. Move early to take ownership for the change.
  • Seek ways to Capitalise. Don’t freeze or become shell-shocked – & be blinded to the inevitable opportunities.
  • Explore Options. Relook at your career/life – so you can emerge with increased clarity & motivation for the future.
  • Think Independently. Don’t abdicate making your own decisions – on the wings of others’ agendas.
  • Become Change Resilient. Understanding that change is not a one-shot deal – develop plan to preempt the next round.